News Archive

2022

  • January

    VARSITY BASKETBALL WINS FIRST LEAGUE GAME

    Coach Alifano

    The team opened its league play with a home game against Collegiate on Thursday, January 13. Their trapping 2-3 zone turned the Collegiate team over multiple times in the first half, resulting in a 16-point lead at halftime. The final score was: Allen-Stevenson 56  -- Collegiate 24!
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  • A Day at the MAOseum


    Today, eighth-grade students presented their research-based history projects about Mao Zedong for a day at the MAOseum!

    Students developed a thesis about whether or not Mao was an effective leader during the Cultural Revolution and conducted research to support their thesis.
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  • Safe and Savvy Searching: Digital Fluency at Allen-Stevenson

    The first iPhone hit the market in 2007, just fourteen years ago and a year before most of our eighth graders were born. Our current Allen-Stevenson students have never lived in a time without the internet, smartphones, and social media. Coming to this realization, in 2014, Allen-Stevenson’s Sarah Kresberg and Liz Storch (later joined by Tatyana Dvorkin) proposed that our students needed to learn the critical tools necessary to navigate this new, fast-paced, and often turbulent digital world. And thus, Digital Fluency was born.
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  • Transforming Favorite Snacks into Pop Art


    Alex Exposito, an accomplished artist and Allen-Stevenson Art Teacher, introduced our fifth-grade boys to the work of contemporary pop artists Joan Linder, Claus Oldenburg, Andy Warhol, and Takashi Murakami.
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  • Upper Division Assembly - We're Back!

    This morning's Upper Division Assembly featured Head of School, David Trower, who thanked our students for coming out in droves to yesterday's on-site COVID testing before the return to school today. He emphasized the importance of protecting one another before demonstrating for the boys the proper wearing of medical-grade masks (now required).
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< 2022


Allen-Stevenson’s distinctive “enlightened traditional” approach educates boys to become scholars and gentlemen.